Welcome to the Will Rogers Polo Club in Pacific Palisades California

WILL ROGERS POLO CLUB
WILL ROGERS POLO CLUB

The Will Rogers Polo Field is the only remaining polo field in Los Angeles California.

You may find it hard to believe, but in the 1930's, there were over 25 polo fields in the Los Angeles, including the Uplifters Polo Field (located where Brooktree Street is now) and the Riviera Polo Field (located where Paul Revere High School is now).

The park was originally the private estate of Will Rogers: famed humorist, newspaper columnist, cowboy, author, movie star and polo player. In fact, Will Rogers landscaped the polo field in 1926, before he even built his home! Rogers and his family lived here between 1928 and 1935. During this period, he and his friends (ie. David Niven, Spencer Tracy, Hal Roach, Walt Disney and Clark Gable) played on this field on weekend mornings and then ride over to Uplifter's to watch the "high goal" games.

After Will's death in 1935, his wife Betty, gave the estate as a gift to the State of California (1944) on the condition that equestrian activities continue at the park.

In 1953, the legendary C.D. LeBlanc started the Will Rogers Polo CLub: making us the thirteenth oldest polo club in the United States, rich in tradition and enthusiasm.

If you come out and watch our games, be aware that an enormous amount of "behind the scenes" preparation has made this event possible. Each player has two to four horses; which require feeding, cleaning and daily exercise during the week preceeding each game. Most of the players board their horses elsewhere, which means that earlier in the day, they trailered their horses to the park for the game. The horses are then brushed and "tacked up" in their special saddles, bridle and leg protection wraps. The players dress in their white joudpers, team shirts, boots, knee guards and riding spurs. Between chukkers (periods of play), players and grooms, frantically change horses and adjust their tack. A thousand details can go wrong (and often do)! But, at that sublime moment when the mallet touches the ball, it all seems gloriously worthwhile.